• Jeremy

Exercising to Reduce Guilt


Often times many people choose to train or exercise in order to negate all of the "bad" things that they did the week before.

It's almost like there is this scale that has the good on one side and the bad on the other and we are constantly trying to keep it balanced.

This type of thinking rarely serves us.

We get caught in this cycle of feeling guilty about the cookie that we ate or the lethargic weekend that we had and the only way to negate all of that guilt is to exercise.

Sweating on top of a treadmill for multiple hours is the picture that most of us think of.

We feel like we need to be punished. But not with a timeout or a slap on the wrist.

No... Here, exercise is the punishment.

And it is such a flawed way to think about it.

Ask yourself the question if that type of relationship with your self/body is going to last in the long run.

Probably not.

A lot of this is also tied to a deep anger that most people have surrounding food. Many believe that they will never be able to eat the things that they want to eat and maintain their health/weight.

Not only is this a victim mentality, but it also is simply not true.

Everyone is able to eat what they want and have total control over their weight at the same time.

Now, am I say that you can go eat ice cream all day and still be lean and athletic?

No, but what I am saying is that it is absolutely possible to eat ice cream, remain lean and athletic, and not feel guilty all at the same time.

Negating guilt with exercise rarely works.

The solution here is to choose not to feel guilty in the first place.


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